Our 12 Favorite Free Activities for Homeschoolers in Need of Late Spring Crafts for Preschoolers

Our 12 Favorite Free Activities for Homeschoolers in Need of Late Spring Crafts for Preschoolers


For a lot of us our homeschool year is starting to wind down. Many homeschoolers school year-round and are looking for fun, engaging activities to incorporate in late Spring and early summer. Summer fun for kids is important to keep boredom from creeping in. Here are some of our top ideas to inspire a love of learning all year long.
 

FREE & Cheap Ideas for Spring and Summer Homeschoolers

 

  • Nature Journal- grab a plain notebook, some high quality colored pencils and head to a beautiful spot to let your children lose to study. You’ll be amazed at how much they enjoy studying the world around them.

 

  • A Phrenology Wheel- we’ll look more at this in a few weeks. This is a great way to document milestones, moon phases, or the change in the trees and plants in your area.

 

  • Water- What kid doesn’t love to play in water?!? Set up a few five-gallon buckets and let them make predictions about if items will sink or float.

 

  • Flower color walks- Grab paint sample strips of each color and head on a walk or to the local botanic gardens. Encourage children to try to match the colors of the flowers to a color on their paint strip.

 

  • Farmer’s Market- A trip to the farmer’s market is a great place to work on social skills, learn about farming, see new foods, and work on counting money.

 

  • Garage sale- Speaking of counting money- holding a garage sale or lemonade stand is an incredibly educational experience! From advertising to organizing, payment and everything in between- a yard sale is a great learning opportunity.

 

  • Free events at the library- The local library usually has all kinds of great opportunities, especially once the local public schools start to let out. Check them out!

 

  • Summer camp at a local school- This one isn’t free but it’s worth noting. Sometimes the local schools will allow homeschoolers to participate in summer camp or sports.

 

  • Create a nature sensory basket- Sensory baskets are a classic part of a Montessori education. Give your homeschooler(s) a basket or bag and let them fill it with items from nature they find interesting. Keep it available at home so they can look at it whenever they’d like.
     

  • Foraging walks- Herb foraging, and urban foraging, are gaining popularity. Local herbal apothecaries often offer free or cheap herb walks where you can learn about local edible plants and how to prepare them.
     

  • Sidewalk chalk- practice your handwriting and math facts under the sun!
     

  • Learn about the water cycle- Spring showers are the perfect way to start studying the water cycle with your homeschoolers. Grab that rain gear and head out to learn.
     

  • Stargaze- Send the kids to bed early and then surprise them with a star watching trip by waking them up and loading up the car to head out. You can even download an app to help you know what you’re viewing.
     

  • Visit a petting zoo or local farm- Spring is the perfect time to learn about animals and see baby animals and plants in bloom.  

 

What are some of your favorite activities for Spring? We’d love to see what you’re doing to bring spring into your homeschool routine. Share pictures on Instagram and make sure to tag us with your favorite activities!

 


Want more tips and tricks to improve your homeschool? Take the quiz below to find out what kind of learner your child is! Then download our FREE Montessori activity guide customized for their favorite learning style.

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Want to See Inside Our Montessori-Based Kits?

Math Kit I - PreK to 3rd Grade

Language Arts A - PreK to 1st Grade

Amanda Osenga

Amanda is a former Montessori teacher who is now homeschooling her only child, a seven-year-old boy. Her family resides in an Airstream that is parked in Colorado. She loves Colorado’s outdoor opportunities. When she’s not schooling, she also blogs at TreehouseDaily.com, works as a Virtual Assistant and loves reading and creating hand-lettering pieces.

The Treehouse Daily >

 

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Free Montessori Based Spring Activities For Kids

FREE Montessori Based Spring Activities For Kids


Simply because the homeschool year is wrapping up, that doesn’t mean your children’s education has to. We’re proud to bring you these free Montessori based activities for kids to work on reading, language, math and more this month.  

 

"Mary, Mary, quite contrary,

How does the May activity pack help your child grow?

With Montessori works and reading great books

And flower crafts all in a row!"

Educational Activities For Kids To Help Your Child Bloom

 

Here at ShillerLearning, we want for nothing more than to see kids love learning. Many of our families homeschool year round, or have a special summer school. If you’ve been looking for something free and fun to do, this pack is perfect for you. We’ve included some classic Montessori works, as well as a few fun arts and crafts. This pack is all about flowers, gardens, birds, and getting outside. We’re certain these activities will help your kids bloom right on into summer!  

 

  • Reading Comprehension

 

In this month’s pack, we’ve included two works based on The Gardener by Sarah Stewart. These are both designed to help with reading comprehension. Six additional books are included on a book list, these same works could be applied to each book. Or download a few audio books and enjoy listening to them while you work on making Washi tape flowers and arranging fresh-cut flowers. Reading comprehension is something children sometimes struggle with and is certainly a skill we hope these free activity packs will help with.

 

  • Scheduling This Pack

 

Figuring out how to schedule these packs, especially outside of “normal” school time can be tricky for some families. We have over 15 Montessori works in this pack. A couple of suggestions would be to have a “nature study” day one day a week this summer where your family takes a nature hike to find flowers for the pressed flower work, and completes a couple additional works afterward. Another option would be to have all of these works prepared and save them for rainy or hot afternoons. Several of these works would be great to use in the car on trips, or to have available to keep kids entertained while running errands or at a restaurant- especially the lacing cards! If you have a Montessori shelf set up, place these activities for your kids out along with the books on the booklist to enjoy seeing them reading and learning about flowers.

  • Additional Suggestions For Kids And Parents

 

Purchasing a local flower guide, or visiting a state park or agricultural center at a local university would be a great field trip this month. It would be a fun way to learn about local wildflowers and help your children identify them. Local herbal apothecaries and community groups often host foraging walks, where you can learn about local edible plants and how to prepare them.  

 

  • Parents might enjoy reading the following books:

 

Last Child in the Woods and Vitamin N by Richard Louv

The Lost Art of Reading Nature’s Signs by Tristan Gooley

Nature Anatomy by Julia Rothman

 

As Maria Montessori herself said,

 

“Let the children be free; encourage them; let them run outside when it is raining; let them remove their shoes when they find a puddle of water; and when the grass of the meadows is wet with dew, let them run on it and trample it with their bare feet; let them rest peacefully when a tree invites them to sleep beneath its shade; let them shout and laugh when the sun wakes them in the morning.”

We hope this pack will encourage you to enjoy and learn more about the great outdoors. Plus this month’s pack is just as free as fresh air and sunshine! So download it now and start reading with your child before the summer passes you by!



Want to See Inside Our Montessori-Based Kits?

Math Kit I - PreK to 3rd Grade

Language Arts A - PreK to 1st Grade

Amanda Osenga

Amanda is a former Montessori teacher who is now homeschooling her only child, a seven-year-old boy. Her family resides in an Airstream that is parked in Colorado. She loves Colorado’s outdoor opportunities. When she’s not schooling, she also blogs at TreehouseDaily.com, works as a Virtual Assistant and loves reading and creating hand-lettering pieces.

The Treehouse Daily >

 

How This Free Grace & Courtesy Printable Pack Turns “Chores” into Games

How This Free Grace & Courtesy Printable Pack Turns “Chores” into Games


The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines Courtesy as: “behavior marked by polished manners or respect for others : courteous behavior.” In the Montessori method, an emphasis is placed on Grace and Courtesy as part of a student’s education. What exactly does this mean?

Grace and Courtesy in the Montessori context is as we read in the definition above, helping our children develop habits and manners that allow them to show politeness and care. Grace and Courtesy is extended to ourselves, our loved ones, our environment, our pets, and our community. These skills help us to help others, contribute in meaningful ways to society and make the world a better place.  

 

In this month’s free pack, we have over a dozen activities designed to help your child gain an understanding of Grace and Courtesy, and to incorporate these principles into your home. We even made several “games” for your kids out of these lessons.

Who said manners have to be no-fun?

 

We have included some classic Montessori works such as “Walking the Line”, as well as a fun Grace and Courtesy board game. While some of these activities may seem like common sense, much of Grace and Courtesy consists of life skills that children do, in fact, need to be taught and practice. This pack may be used over an extended period of time and you will likely find yourself coming back to some of these activities time and time again.

 

It is our hope that little by little, these works will help your child see the world in a new way and look out for ways to care for others. These works can be used by all ages, although many of the activities are geared towards preschool and early Elementary. You may find that some of these activities are easier to use spontaneously when a need arises to work through conflict, frustration, or care in a different manner.  

 

These are perfect when you want to try a “new” approach. If your child has issues with specific rude behaviors, there are a few games they can try in this pack like the "Quiet Game" or "Preparing and Serving Food". These are great to start the conversation around manners in a “fun” way. However, discipline does have its place to help children understand their actions have consequences.

Some of these activities may be incorporated into role-play activities as well.  

 

Parents and adults in a child’s life are always the best examples. Our children are always watching and imitate the ways we interact with others as well. Grace and Courtesy skills are skills we work on all our lives and skills we can model.

 

More tips for parents to model Grace and Courtesy:

 

  • Avoid talking on your cell phone when at the store, bank, or other locations where you will be interacting with employees,

  • Demonstrate speaking with a calm, quiet, and clear voice,

  • Look people in the eye when speaking to them,

  • Ask before hugging or touching others,

  • Call cashiers, servers, librarians, etc. by their name when thanking them. This small step makes a dramatic difference to them and to your child in learning how to politely interact,

  • Demonstrate pushing in your chair, hanging up your coat, and careful care of your environment,

  • Communicate when you need some time alone, and when you have strong feelings that may mean you need a little extra space,

  • Speak in the positive during challenging situations and suggest positive solutions,

  • Ask your child if you can join them in watching them work, playing with them, or joining in an activity,

  • Use open communication with a lot of “I feel,” “Please,” “Thank you,” “I appreciate you,” “Excuse me,” “May I” phrases

  • Show how to take turns with another adult

  • Write a letter to someone with your child

  • Aid anyone you see in need while out and about, help the older woman carry her groceries, distract the crying baby, grab the item off the high shelf, etc. This can be a bit awkward to develop but sets a big example.

Songs and games children enjoy that enforce these concepts include:

 

  • Where is Thumbkin

  • Mother May I?

  • Polite Patty Says (Simon Says)

  • Getting To Know You

  • Telephone

  • Teddy Bear Picnic

 

We hope you enjoy this FREE pack, download your copy below   and please share with your friends on Facebook!

 



Want to See Inside Our Montessori-Based Kits?

Math Kit I - PreK to 3rd Grade

Language Arts A - PreK to 1st Grade

Amanda Osenga

Amanda is a former Montessori teacher who is now homeschooling her only child, a seven-year-old boy. Her family resides in an Airstream that is parked in Colorado. She loves Colorado’s outdoor opportunities. When she’s not schooling, she also blogs at TreehouseDaily.com, works as a Virtual Assistant and loves reading and creating hand-lettering pieces.

The Treehouse Daily >

 

The Family Guide to Homeschool Conventions

Finding Inspiration to Refresh and Renew Your Homeschool: The Family Guide to Homeschool Conventions


Homeschool convention season is in full swing. Conventions are a wonderful way to connect with other local homeschooling families, discover new curriculum, hear expert talks, and find refreshment. Often by this time of the year, we’re in the winter doldrums and may be beginning to feel burnt out on homeschooling. Perhaps we’re using a curriculum that’s not working well for our children, perhaps we’re struggling to find time management to get it all done or feeling pressure from family members about our homeschool choices. Find yourself a great convention to renew and find inspiration for the rest of our school year and the school ear to come.

 

However, they can also be incredibly overwhelming. With of people, tables, information overload. We hope to help you navigate homeschool conventions and get the most out of your experiences.

 

·        Pick wisely- it can be tempting to go to every convention in your area. Pick the main one you’re interested in and start with it this year. You can always try another convention next year.

·         Use the buddy system. If you have another homeschooling friend, go together! Especially if one of you has been to this conference before.

·       Connect in-person. Homeschool conventions are a fantastic way to meet people you know from online groups. Make sure to exchange numbers or pick a time & place for the members of your group to meet. Beautiful friendships can form from meeting your digital friends at conventions!

·         Get help with the kids. Many homeschool conventions offer a kid’s program. If not, consider getting a sitter or attending with your spouse, mom, mother-in-law, etc. Having another set of hands to help with kids ensures you can get all the information you want, ask lots of questions to vendors, and have a well-deserved break.

·         Make a schedule. Your convention will provide a master schedule of events. There will most likely be more to do than you’re able to do in your time there. Make your own schedule so you can get everything in that you’re hoping for. Make sure to think about what you’re hoping to accomplish most. If you’re most in need of curriculum, budget more time for looking through the tables. If you’re most going for the social time, budget that in. Allow some wiggle room too.

·         Check the rules. Yes, homeschool conventions have rules. Some have rules regarding what you can and cannot bring, as well as helpful suggestions on what to wear.

·       Familiarize yourself with the area. Do you need to bring your own food? If you have food allergies, make sure there is a restaurant nearby that you can safely eat at or see if there is a cafeteria or tables at the convention for you to eat a sack lunch. Scope out a park for the kids to burn off some energy at, and check out local attractions If you can tack on some extra time.

·       Budget your money and bring cash. It can be tempting to splurge on the sales you’ll find. Before you know it, you’ve spent an entire paycheck! Make sure to budget BEFORE you go. And bring cash, oftentimes at the end of conventions, vendors will have deep discounts on the materials left on-hand for cash payments only.

·         Look over the vendor list first. Your convention materials will provide a vendor list. Scope out their website, blog, and social media outlets before the conference. Make a list of questions you want to ask any vendors and know who your “must see,” “would like to see,” and “avoid” vendors are.

·         Know what you need and want. Before you go, make sure to make a list of your top priorities for what to buy, who to meet, and what to learn.

·         Scope out the venue. If you can, scope it out BEFORE the event & you create your schedule. This will help you get an idea for how big the event is. Sometimes larger conventions will even have a map on their website beforehand. When you arrive at the convention, do a quick walkthrough of the venue. Don’t stop, don’t talk to anyone yet. Just get a feel for it and scope out where your “must see” tables are.

·         Bring a rolling suitcase or comfortable bag. If you’re planning to buy a lot, bring a rolling suitcase or small cart to put all your purchases in. This will help you avoid having to haul heavy books through the exhibition hall.

·         Keep an extra bag on hand (or 2). Having an extra small-bag for flyers is always a clever idea. Then you can quickly sort out the flyers you’re interested in and what need to go in the recycling bin. A second bag for freebies is a good idea too.

·         Bring address labels. These conventions have giveaways galore- you could spend the entire time filling out entry forms, or bring sticky labels to plop on and go! Make sure they include address, number, and email address.

·         Hydrate, eat and be comfortable. Those cute shoes you have that are super uncomfortable?   Don’t even think about them. Wear comfortable shoes, your feet will thank you. Drink plenty of water & make sure to keep a snack in your bag for each member of your family. It’s easy to lose track of time in great convention halls that have no windows!

·         Don’t forget a notebook. You’re going to want to take a lot of notes. Bring a notebook and a couple pens.

·         Take some time to reflect afterwards. Give yourself time to discuss what you learned with family and friends, to incorporate any changes you learned, and to journal. Perhaps you can get together with friends from the convention and talk about what you all learned together.

·         Enjoy!!! Homeschool conventions can feel like summer camp for grownups 😊 Enjoy, ride the post-convention joy for a while and find refreshment & renewal from your convention experience.

    Come visit us at the following conventions:


    Amanda Osenga

    Amanda is a former Montessori teacher who is now homeschooling her only child, a seven-year-old boy. Her family resides in an Airstream that is parked in Colorado. She loves Colorado’s outdoor opportunities. When she’s not schooling, she also blogs at TreehouseDaily.com, works as a Virtual Assistant and loves reading and creating hand-lettering pieces.

    The Treehouse Daily >

     

    26 FREE Montessori Printables to Enrich your Homeschool

    26 FREE Montessori Printables to Enrich your Homeschool


    Many parents are intimidated by the sheer volume and cost of all the stuff needed for a Montessori-based homeschool. The Montessori method is so effective because it is hands on and engages all the senses. Browsing through a Montessori supply catalog can make your head spin and your wallet hurt. Don’t fret. It is totally doable to get a lot of the materials for FREE with printables. Invest in an inexpensive laminator (or ask for a deal at your local print shop) and you’re good to go.  

     

    This is a list you’re going to want to keep bookmarked for years to come. In no particular order:

     

     

    Over 100 Printables for everything from reading, math, seasons, holidays, popular children’s books & shows, and more.  

     

    Another resource for loads of printables for every Montessori subject.

     

    Here you’ll find printables for basic classroom supplies, classic Montessori activities, and lots of 3-part Nomenclature cards.

     

    When you subscribe to their blog you receive tons of free printables, as well as access to free ebooks about Montessori education and more.  

     

    A new printable every month covering a wide range of subjects.

     

    This is a place for other Montessorians just like you to share their materials.

     

    Has some paid printables as well as occasional free printables, often connected to current events or holidays.

     

    While not necessarily Montessori-based, this deserves to be included. There are lots of free packs children can complete at National Parks or at home and earn free badges. They even did a special eclipse badge for the solar eclipse.

     

    Another source for a wide-range of printables.

     

    Hundreds of free books including Maria Montessori’s texts. Available as downloads for your Kindle, computer, phone or printable. There are loads of children’s stories too, many classics are found here.

    Every month we publish new, free printable packs for all parents. You may visit our Free Montessori Activities And Printables Section of our website to see the latest printable pack.

    Planning & Classroom Supplies

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Fun :

     

    Creating your own game boards is always a fun activity for homeschool families to do together.

     

     

    Dozens of printable games, art projects, and homemade toys.

     

     

    Create Your Own !

     

    Creating your own printables is easy so long as you know where to look. Check out some of these resources to custom make your own lessons.

     

    • Canva is a super easy to use image design program. Plug it in & print it off.

     

    • Wikimedia Commons, look for Public Domain photos to print and use for Nomenclature cards, science, reading, and more.

    Do you have any favorite Montessori printables? Share them with us in the comments and help build more resources for fellow homeschooling families.

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    Want to See Inside Our Montessori-Based Kits?

    Math Kit I - PreK to 3rd Grade

    Language Arts A - PreK to 1st Grade

    Amanda Osenga

    Amanda is a former Montessori teacher who is now homeschooling her only child, a seven-year-old boy. Her family resides in an Airstream that is parked in Colorado. She loves Colorado’s outdoor opportunities. When she’s not schooling, she also blogs at TreehouseDaily.com, works as a Virtual Assistant and loves reading and creating hand-lettering pieces.

    The Treehouse Daily >

     

    FREE Winter Printable Pack With Literature Works

    Recipe for A Winter Literature Pack



    Winter has arrived and we are thrilled to bring you these fun activities for kids to complete this winter. Inspired by the Montessori method, we've cooked up a lovely blend of literature based works for you. Enjoy!
     

    Servings: 17 Montessori Works (Make sure to share the results and fun with your friends!)

    Time: Varies by age and ability of child.

     

    Combine all of the above with a lot of love, fun, patience, excitement and joy. Blend in shelf works and sensory bins from home, if desired. Season with a dash of warm & cozy to ensure you get the full wintery effect. Upon completion, you’ll find you’ve completed counting, graphing, games, measuring, writing activities, a bucket list, stitching and more.  

    This is best served alongside a desire to learn together (and a cup of hot cocoa or tea).  

     

    Here is a sneak peak at some of the things we think you’ll love:

    • 100% FREE

    • Preschoolers through Middle Schoolers can all enjoy

      • You’ll find activities that appeal to a wide range of ages and that your older kids can work on with your younger children.

    • Designed to be used as standalone works

      • For those of you who do have our curriculum, we include some suggestions from our materials. You will still be able to use these packs without them though.

    • Print & Go, very little prep-work required. Just gather the needed supplies.

    • A great way to ease back in from your break

      • This pack combines traditional Montessori works with STEM activities and some tasty treats, it’s a great way to ease back into school after your winter break.  

    • Tasty!!!

      • We’ve got a couple yummy treats included in this pack too :)

    • Literature based

      • These works are all based around some popular winter books. Your local library should have them all for you to enjoy & many have been made into short movies as well.

     

    • Warm & Cozy

      • This time of year, it’s nice to cozy up and stay warm. We’re bringing you works that will help you stay warm and cozy in the depth of winter!

    • Fun & Games

      • We’ve got several fun games that the whole family can enjoy together


    Make sure to let us know what you think about it on the ShillerLearning Facebook page or Larry’s Club Facebook Group. If you share photos on Instagram, make sure to tag us @ShillerMath We hope you enjoy! Don’t forget, we’ll have a new FREE Printable pack every month for you.

     


    Amanda Osenga

    Amanda is a former Montessori teacher who is now homeschooling her only child, a seven-year-old boy. Her family resides in an Airstream that is parked in Colorado. She loves Colorado’s outdoor opportunities. When she’s not schooling, she also blogs at TreehouseDaily.com, works as a Virtual Assistant and loves reading and creating hand-lettering pieces.

    The Treehouse Daily >

     

    Audrey McCormick

    Audrey is a busy homeschool mom of 6, preacher’s wife, and the founder of David’s Gift, a non-profit organization that provides funds for funeral expenses for children. She was born and raised in northwest Louisiana, where she is also raising her family. When she has a little free time, she enjoys camping, hiking, scrapbooking, and other crafts. You can follow Audrey’s adventures on her blog BeautifulGrace.net .  

    Beautiful Grace . >